Thoughts on appointing an Executive Director

 

Message from the Directors of the Appropedia Foundation:

In April 2016, Appropedia will celebrate its tenth birthday!

One decade since its launch and over 75,000,000 visits later, we can celebrate the wonderful work of the many thousands of contributors to Appropedia from around the world. With tens of thousands of articles – edited over 300,000 times – on solutions for building rich, sustainable lives, Appropedia has become a vital resource for international development, sustainability, education, research, making and sharing.

The Appropedia Foundation has been privileged to support the development of Appropedia. We have, we think, developed a culture and an approach which has worked well and gotten us this far. But we now want to go further.

Appropedia has now grown to the point where we think that new levels of commitment and investment are required to enable it to grow further. To reach more people. In more languages. With more content. With more quality. With the latest tools. And to bring its users together more.

The Directors of the Appropedia Foundation would like to hear your opinions on how we should invest and support Appropedia over the next ten years. While we remain committed to the mission and values that have guided Appropedia from the start, we want to explore how we might change our structure and how re-energize our engagement with the wider world.

We think that the Appropedia Foundation should recruit its first full-time Executive Director to oversee the development of Appropedia. This would take a fairly traditional structure for a non-profit, with the Executive Director reporting to the board and with responsibility for fundraising (including, initially, for their own salary). They would not necessarily need to be an expert in web technologies, but would rather support and develop a team to work on Appropedia.

Over the next four weeks, we would like to hear your thoughts on this idea of recruiting an Executive Director. What do you think of this idea please? You can leave feedback here, on Appropedia, on Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Once we have considered your feedback, we will make a decision on how to proceed and may come back to the community for input into the priorities of the Executive Director.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us and, indeed, for for all your contributions to Appropedia. It literally wouldn’t exist without its users!
-Lonny, Chris, Curt, Andrew & Kiva

First International Meeting for Sustainable Construction in the Dominican Republic

On a run of four presentations in three days, I wanted to share the most visually stimulating one from ENICONS First International Meeting for Sustainable Construction in the Dominican Republic.

I had the pleasure of presenting with some amazing architects to an audience of engaged architects and change makers.

Please feel free to ask questions since the presentation is mostly pictures. In addition, the majority of the technologies presented do have Appropedia links to more information.

Chiapas Rainwater

(This is part of a five project series on HSU Chiapas 2010 started here)

Part of rainwater team building a system in a community near Acteal.

Rain.  Coming back from a summer in Mexico, everyone expects me to be tanner. Like other assumptions about a country as big and diverse as Mexico, not necessary so…  San Cristobal de las Casas was gorgeous.  San Cristobal was interesting.  San Cristobal had great coffee, chocolate, people, languages, music and fun.  San Cristobal was not that sunny… in fact, it rained about an inch per week during the five weeks of Appropriate Technology classes. There is a dry season, we just weren’t there for it.  The rain is enjoyable, but the waterborne and foodborne illnesses that affect many (including me and the students) are not. It was in that context that we were so excited to have one of the five projects for the Humboldt State University – Chiapas 2010, full immersion in Spanish and Appropriate Technology, summer abroad program be rainwater catchment systems.
Rainwater Catchment At A Glance
Description: Catching rainwater (often before it hits the ground), filtering and storing it for future use.
Inputs: rain
Outputs: Usable, potable if filtered, water
Improvements: reduced run-off and erosion, increased access to clean water, reduced time spent collecting and transporting water, reduced mosquito breeding areas near home

The whole rainwater catchment team building in Chiapas.

A team of four students collaborated with local designers and community members to build three systems: one with the appropriate technology demonstration home of Juan Hidalgo in San Cristobal and two with a community near Acteal. The student designers went through a few iterations at the demo house, testing and finding leaks, until they got it right. They then used that information to design and build the systems with the more rural community.  They also worked with Otros Mundos to start the construction of two 20,000 liter ferrocement tanks for storage.  Here is their rainwater system documentation in English and Spanish.  Here is some of the needed math for design.
Their innovations:
  • Using a first flush in Chiapas (I haven’t seen it other places here)
  • Using a PVC cap with one hole drilled high (for drainage and a cord for removing it) as the drain of the first flush. Having this hole high on the end-cap of a 90 degree elbow will keep it from plugging soon and keep the spray away from the house and into a bucket for reuse.
  • Using used vegetable oil to protect the wood supports.
  • Using costales (earth bags) for the base of one system.
  • Using tamped sand, instead of concrete, for the supports of one system.
  • Using wire to keep bent roofing metal in a channel shape.
Next steps:
  • Finish the ferrocement tanks in the community.
  • Revisit the systems in one year to see what went wrong.
  • Innovate!
  • Build a database of local rainwater systems (see image) and feedbacks.
  • Re-Innovate!
  • Workshops and community meetings on rainwater collection and water in general.
different (and probably better) way to use PVC with Rainwater Catchment
*This image is not our rainwater system, but it is the coolest way I have seen PVC used as a gutter (which is usually a big pain and doesn’t work all that well). We are going to try out this system at Otros Mundos.  In this image, Tania and Claudia are assessing its construction.  Now take that system and get a first flush on it and you’d probably have one great system!

Humboldt Sustainable Future

Humboldt Sustainability Future: Energy – clean, secure; Waste – no such thing, mottainai; Transport – safe, fun, connected; Food – abundant, salubrious; Water – celebrated; Habitat – thriving; Community – just, vibrant, respecting of diversity and heritage.

Last Wednesday, I had the honor of presenting on the future of Humboldt (Northern California) Sustainability for the Humboldt Bay Center for Sustainable Living and the Redwood Coast Energy Authority. The presentation was part of a growing movement of community wide sustainability and hopes to catalyze a series of large-scale open space technology style meetings.

This clip starts a few minutes into the presentation, just after I describe that the presentation was made with the help of many local and over-the-internet colleagues. Click the info button to access the introduction (part 1).


Thanks to StreamGuys for providing excellent streaming services.