Open access content on Appropedia

CD3WD (CD for the 3rd World), and WikiGreen (the first major green wiki) have done an enormous amount of work getting permission for books and other great resources in sustainability and development, and getting it online. All up there are thousands of pages on specific agricultural subjects, appropriate technologies for building, and more.

Much of that content has ended up on Appropedia. It’s valuable content, and we are (we believe) allowed to share it. But we’ve had a dilemma: it’s not under an open license, as far as we know. It’s open access, but can’t be reused or modified, and certainly there hasn’t been permission given to use commercially. That clashes with our default license.

So, do we remove it? That would be a great loss to the internet community when they search for answers on these important subjects. This is something I’ve agonized over. So instead, we are now placing notices on these pages, noting that these are exceptions to Appropedia’s regular license. So far, all the CD3WD pages that we have, have had the notices placed on them. Next, we need to list the good material made available by the work of Eric and Roy.

If you’re aware of any work which should not be displayed (i.e. the rights-owners do not give permission for it to be made available as open access), please let us know, and we will take action to fix things up (gain permission or remove it).

BarCampAfrica

I love a BarCamp, but BarCampAfrica will be way more exciting. A BarCamp is a semi-structured gathering of mostly geeky people, and a great place to pick up new ideas. This one will be for people who are passionate about doing something positive for Africa – much closer to my own passions.

It’s about “technology, mobility, art, social justice, sustainability, micro-finance – and all things Africa-esque.”

BarCampAfrica

I love a BarCamp, but BarCampAfrica will be way more exciting. A BarCamp is a semi-structured gathering of mostly geeky people, and a great place to pick up new ideas. This one will be for people who are passionate about doing something positive for Africa – much closer to my own passions.

It’s about “technology, mobility, art, social justice, sustainability, micro-finance – and all things Africa-esque.”

Open Sustainability Network Camp

The days to OSNCamp are counting down. In full, it’s the first “Open Sustainability Network Camp,” October 18-19, happening in San Francisco and online. Here’s a bit of an explanation of what OSNCamp is about:

Why “Open Sustainability”? Because when we build our own resource banks and keep them closed, we limit our impact, our potential. “Open Sustainability” is about opening up our silos of knowledge, sharing and making links, for a better world. (This is a big topic – watch for future posts on this.)

And… what exactly do we mean by “Sustainability”? It’s a “just sustainability” – a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, living creatively and constructively with the ecosystems that sustain us.

What’s this “Network“? It’s a vision. You don’t have to be a member to come. It’s a new network that organizations committed to knowledge-sharing are joining, and this is the first gathering.

It’s not yet another program or site to commit to – we use existing resources within the network where possible (which is why Appropedia is being used as the wiki for this event).

It’s a… “Camp”? No, you don’t need to bring a tent. This is a BarCamp-style event: attendance is free, everyone is a participant (no spectators) and we decide the talks on the day. (Presentation ideas are welcomed beforehand of course.) You know how in all the conferences you’ve been to, the best parts have been over tea and coffee or in hallways, and the conversations between one talk and the next? We’ll have lots more of that, plus you get a say in what talks, forums and activities happen.

Now, being a BarCamp, there’s still a lot to do in the weeks leading up to the event. You, the participant, can play a part to ensure this is not just a great meeting with interesting people, but an awesome event where fantastic synergy and cooperation emerge: You can:

  • Volunteer
  • Work on the wiki pages.
  • Help setup OSNCamp Online.
  • Bring a switch and/or wireless bridge on Sunday, so that we’ll have better wifi access on the second day (and follow other such matters on the mailing list).
  • Sponsor the conference and the network – financially, or by promoting the event to your networks. (When you blog, please use the tag osncamp2008.)
  • Look around on the wiki – there are plenty more suggestions.
  • Do that thing that none of us have thought of yet.

A great bunch of people have already signed up (scroll down to the Attendee List to see them). Hope to see you there, or online!

Open Sustainability Network Camp

The days to OSNCamp are counting down. In full, it’s the first “Open Sustainability Network Camp,” October 18-19, happening in San Francisco and online. Here’s a bit of an explanation of what OSNCamp is about:

Why “Open Sustainability”? Because when we build our own resource banks and keep them closed, we limit our impact, our potential. “Open Sustainability” is about opening up our silos of knowledge, sharing and making links, for a better world. (This is a big topic – watch for future posts on this.)

And… what exactly do we mean by “Sustainability”? It’s a “just sustainability” – a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, living creatively and constructively with the ecosystems that sustain us.

What’s this “Network“? It’s a vision. You don’t have to be a member to come. It’s a new network that organizations committed to knowledge-sharing are joining, and this is the first gathering.

It’s not yet another program or site to commit to – we use existing resources within the network where possible (which is why Appropedia is being used as the wiki for this event).

It’s a… “Camp”? No, you don’t need to bring a tent. This is a BarCamp-style event: attendance is free, everyone is a participant (no spectators) and we decide the talks on the day. (Presentation ideas are welcomed beforehand of course.) You know how in all the conferences you’ve been to, the best parts have been over tea and coffee or in hallways, and the conversations between one talk and the next? We’ll have lots more of that, plus you get a say in what talks, forums and activities happen.

Now, being a BarCamp, there’s still a lot to do in the weeks leading up to the event. You, the participant, can play a part to ensure this is not just a great meeting with interesting people, but an awesome event where fantastic synergy and cooperation emerge: You can:

  • Volunteer
  • Work on the wiki pages.
  • Help setup OSNCamp Online.
  • Bring a switch and/or wireless bridge on Sunday, so that we’ll have better wifi access on the second day (and follow other such matters on the mailing list).
  • Sponsor the conference and the network – financially, or by promoting the event to your networks. (When you blog, please use the tag osncamp2008.)
  • Look around on the wiki – there are plenty more suggestions.
  • Do that thing that none of us have thought of yet.

A great bunch of people have already signed up (scroll down to the Attendee List to see them). Hope to see you there, or online!

What does “Peace One Day” mean to me? Today it means OSN

Last year in late September, I came across the Peace One Day campaign. I missed the day (September 21), but saved the link as an email to myself, thinking that the value in an annual “Peace” day is to remind us with some regularity, so that we do stuff other days of the year. My thought was that in a few weeks I would blog on it and tie it to whatever Appropedia (or LeapingStone, or Village Hope) stuff I was working on. That’s not random… My motivation for joining Appropedia was to do something that felt “real” toward improving lives, helping to bridge cultural gaps, and sustain the environment.

Well, today while trying to squeeze the inbox back down below 20 or so (almost manageable), I noticed the Peace One Day link at the bottom of the email. And it’s 3 days away. Well, the good news is that having that link hanging around was a good reminder all year. And so why not write a blog tying it to something I’m working on?

The biggest thing, and easiest to tie to Peace, is the Open Sustainability Network unconference, or OSNCamp. That’s coming on October 18-19 in San Francisco. It’s the first coming together of a large community of supportive people and organizations that are seeking to expand the impact of open sharing of solutions and collaborative problem solving in sustainability. (We at Appropedia include poverty reduction and international development in that picture.)

If you’re reading this post, maybe you think Peace One Day is a good idea. Maybe you think that openly sharing sustainable solutions can help. If so, why not come join us? There will be options for remote attendence, if travel is an issue, and the conference is free, except for your time. Is Peace One Day worth some of your time?

Welcome to the Appropedia blog

This is the blog to accompany Appropedia, the wiki for solutions in the challenge of building rich, sustainable lives.

Follow our blog to understand how things work, and how we’re dealing with the challenges of a growing wiki expanding into new areas. Your contributions are very welcome – you can start contributing, let us know your questions (commenting here is one way). You can also keep watching here as we talk about how things work in this wiki world, and figure out where you fit in. (But we’d still love it if you dropped us a line.)

This was posted when we were still playing with the Drupal blog, before we switched to WordPress. So we’ll need to make another welcome, soon. – Chriswaterguy 23 Sep 2008

Buckminster Fuller Challenge

Appropedia made it to semi-finalist in the Buckminster Fuller Challenge. (Yay, recognition! Sob, no cash prize.) From our entry:

Difficulties in tracking down existing solutions to appropriate technology problems has led to engineers and fieldworkers wasting time, energy, and resources solving the same problems over and over again. A single shared infrastructure is needed so that the existing disjoint community of appropriate technologists can more easily and openly collaborate on their projects.

…and that’s exactly what we’re doing, in appropriate technology and many related areas.

Originally posted, by the same author, at Pablo Garuda.