Swales… but first, a request for tech support

Another apology – blog feed still broken. Trying all the instructions we’ve found, but nothing seems to work. Any WordPress gurus want to help us out?

If not… then a change of topic: Check out this article on Swales, a great form of water management and specifically Groundwater recharge. A simple design, popular in the permaculture approach to protecting and enhancing the water cycle.

Permaculture wiki, and an update

Update: I want to apologize to everyone who’s frustrated with our broken blog feed. We’ve been given pointers on how to fix it, but since we don’t actually have a tech team (anyone like to help?)  I need to dig in and fix this myself, and… I haven’t got it done yet. But it’s there on the to-do list. Now onto more interesting things.

Permaculture: Plug “permaculture” and “wiki” into a search engine and you’ll get a bunch of hits. Most of them will be pretty empty – inactive, spammed or dormant sites. So what about the dream of creating a freely accessible and usable permaculture manual for the world, for rich and poor alike? It lives.

This collaborative work on a permaculture resource is happening on Appropedia, these days. This is by far the most active site for permaculture topics, as far as I can tell, and I’ve spend some hours scouring the internet. So I’ve started a page to invite collaboration: Permaculture wiki. Check it out, and since it’s a wiki your perspectives are welcomed.

Btw, tech people: if you’re a WordPress wizard and want to help, let us know. And we’re also looking for someone who can pretty up the skin on the wiki…

http://www.appropedia.org/Permaculture

Usability in blogs and stoves

Design prototypes in Myanmar. Which is cooler?

Over at 3brick design, a project spawned from Stanford’s Extreme Affordability class, they take user-centered design seriously, and respect the dignity of the people they’re trying to serve. The examples they’ve displayed so far look elegant and functional – I’ll be interested to see what they come up with.

One thing is sure: it’s unlikely to be a single design. As the context changes, the appropriate technology for the situation tends to change as well. Do the users mainly frying or do slow cooking, for example?

Showing that they think about their users in more than just a cooking context, the project has chosen a nice lean blog skin for WordPress called Darwin, designed to be fast-loading and easy on the eye. Good work.

Picture credit: “3 bricks. Many users.” at the Stanford Cool Product Expo blog.